Home MRI MRI - Fingers and Toes

Melbourne Radiology Clinic

Friday
Sep 19th

MRI - Fingers and Toes

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It is not surprising that as MR image quality has improved and scan times have become shorter, the applications of this modality have increased, such that even smaller body parts are now routinely imaged. Finger tendon, ligament and joint injuries can be elegantly depicted, as can normal anatomical structures (figure 1).

Though such injuries have historically been evaluated with the combination of an X-ray and ultrasound, MRI has the advantage of simultaneously visualising both bone and soft tissues. Similarly, toe injuries can be demonstrated (figures 2 & 3), arthritis, blood vessel and nerve abnormalities, as well as soft tissue and bone tumours (1,2).

Axial and saggital MRI of middle finger

Figure 1. (A) Axial and (B) sagittal MRI of the middle finger demonstrates an area of bright signal (arrow) consistent with focal disruption of the central slip of the extensor tendon at the level of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

(A) Long and (B) short axis MRI of the great toe reveals changes of early osteoarthritis including small bone spurs (arrows), bone marrow oedema and ligament attenuation

Figure 2. (A) Long and (B) short axis MRI of the great toe reveals changes of early osteoarthritis including small bone spurs (arrows), bone marrow oedema and ligament attenuation.

(A) Short axis and (B) sagittal MRI of a benign soft tissue nerve tumour of the great toe (neurofibroma).

Figure 3. (A) Short axis and (B) sagittal MRI of a benign soft tissue nerve tumour of the great toe (neurofibroma).

 

References:

  1. Connell DA, Koulouris G, Thorn DA, Potter HG. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography of the hand. Radiographics 22(3):583-99, 2002
  2. Vilanova JC, Barceló J, Smirniotopoulos JG, Pérez-Andrés R, Villalón M, Miró J, Martin F, Capellades J, Ros PR. Hemangioma from head to toe: MR imaging with pathologic correlation. Radiographics 24(2):367-85, 2004